CD Review: Into His Presence (The Perrys)

The Perrys’ upcoming April 8th StowTown release, Into His Presence, is one of the year’s most highly-anticipated releases. This was a day that many in the Southern Gospel community feared would never come. Over the last fifteen months, during Tracy Stuffle’s protracted, roller-coaster recovery from a January 2013 stroke, there were many points it seemed doubtful…

Have any Southern Gospel projects been certified Gold Records or Platinum Records?

Have any Southern Gospel projects ever been certified Gold or Platinum? The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) instituted the Gold Record award in 1958. At the time, it was awarded to an album with $1,000,000 in retail sales. That came out to about 250,000 units. In 1976, they changed the criteria, instituting the Platinum…

An Interview with Doug Anderson on Drive

In the CD interviews column, instead of sharing a reviewer’s thoughts about a project, we interview the artist to get the artist’s own thoughts. Doug Anderson’s second solo release, Drive, comes out today; he graciously agreed to share some insight into the project. Daniel J. Mount: Because it is a little unusual in this case, I’ll…

Look at what the Couriers did. Do that.

In the mid-1950s, Duane Nicholson (tenor), Neil Enloe (lead), Don Baldwin (baritone), Dave Kyllonen (bass), and Eddie Reece (piano) started performing together as The Couriers. Within about a decade, Baldwin and Reece had left, but Nicholson, Enloe, and Kyllonen carried the group forward as a trio, with Kyllonen moving up to baritone. They retired the…

Forgotten Verses #9: Hark! The Herald Angels Song

During his lifetime, Charles Wesley wrote over 6,000 hymns. One of his best-known, “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” was composed in 1739. The first three verses are quite familiar: 1. Hark! The herald angels sing, “Glory to the newborn King; Peace on earth, and mercy mild, God and sinners reconciled!” Joyful, all ye nations rise,…

Forgotten Verses #8: I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, one of the most noted American poets of the mid-1800s, wrote the words to “I Heard The Bells on Christmas Day.” His first three verses are familiar: 1. I heard the bells on Christmas day Their old familiar carols play, And wild and sweet the words repeat Of peace on earth, good…